Shooting fish in a barrel

If you look at ConservativeHome, you can find some very silly articles right now; so much so that taking the piss out of them is like shooting fish in a barrel. For example, one Jim McConalogue writes that he couldn’t get his book published in Britain but had to go to Austria instead. This was not, as you might think, because the book is crap. Oh, no, it’s because British publishers are anti-British:

It was not at a surprise to me then last year when my poetry collection, Starry Dandelion Night, was published by an Austrian publisher – one of the finest contemporary publishers of English poetry. I knew this because British academics/writers and our publishing industry have all but given up on their own. It happens in all forms of publishing. But looking to the future, I wonder if the Conservatives can change anything underpinning this because British literary culture seems so inherently and irreversibly leftist, by which I mean, anti-British.

How will this get better under the Tories? By magic, apparently:

literary culture […] by free spontaneity and association will assemble under the Conservatives.

I expect when he becomes PM, David Cameron will present his backside to the nation, the sun will shine out of his arse, and all will be sweetness and light!

Some of the comments point out what tosh all this is, such as this one by Angelo Basu:

I thought that we Conservatives were for the market? Last I heard (travel guides aside) publishing wasn’t a state controlled activity in the UK. Publishers publish books they think will appeal to the public. Some publishers might be shock horror left-leaning. Then again, there are publishing houses who might be described as right wing – it wouldn’t be beyond imagining for eg HarperCollins to publish a load of non-lefty books and promote them heavily in the editorial sections of the Times and in programmes on Sky.

I suppose we’ll never know if there are many great lost Tory novels tragically consigned to the slush pile as by definition they won’t see the light of day. I suspect not somehow though.

Perhaps it is because it is a Friday afternoon, but the article is absolute nonsense. Atlas is spinning rather than shrugging.

And then we have Peter Whittle, who decries the clothing standards of modern Britain:

In the Telegraph today, Charles Moore asks why it is that, at a time when decent clothes are more affordable for more people, general standards of dress have never been so dire. […] he’s right; it’s no coincidence that so much of the nostalgia we might indulge in relates to the fashions of even the very recent past. I wrote about this in Look at Me: Celebrating the Self in Modern Britain:

Expressing your own individual sense of style, or dressing in what makes you happiest and most comfortable regardless of the context, is the unchallengeable criterion now. You can cover yourself with tattoos, pierce your eyebrows and belly buttons and wear t-shirts with lame slogans ( Do I Look Like I’m Interested? ) which are designed to simultaneously alienate others while drawing attention to aspects of your character you have decided are interesting. […] over the past thirty years, what is left of the working class has indeed transformed itself into something it never was, and is now fully living up to the middle class view of it. The result has been an army of what we might call kidults, who can be seen in any high street or shopping mall: chubby middle-aged men in long shorts, baggy slogan-covered tops and trainers, waddling like huge babies, clasping bottles of water topped with those special drinking teets.

To which I commented:

Well said Peter! I think that under the Conservatives, Britain should have a clothing police, like they do in Saudi Arabia, that will enforce smart, stylish and decent dress.Under the Labour Party, people have been allowed to wear whatever they like, and clothes shops have therefore been obliged by market forces to pander to the dreadful tastes of the proletarian masses. But, as with literature, clothing is too important to be left to the market!

(via Liberal Conspiracy)

This entry was posted in Britain, politics, society and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Shooting fish in a barrel

  1. Aaron Heath says:

    Well said Peter! I think that under the Conservatives, Britain should have a clothing police, like they do in Saudi Arabia, that will enforce smart, stylish and decent dress.Under the Labour Party, people have been allowed to wear whatever they like, and clothes shops have therefore been obliged by market forces to pander to the dreadful tastes of the proletarian masses. But, as with literature, clothing is too important to be left to the market!

    Ha! Glorious stuff, cabalamat.

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