LGF and the Republicans

Little Green Footballs is one of the most popular right-wing blogs in the USA (currently number 17 on The Truth Laid Bear ecosystem). Which is why it’s interesting that their founder, Charles Johnson, has recently blogged about why he parted ways with the right:

1. Support for fascists, both in America (see: Pat Buchanan, Robert Stacy McCain, etc.) and in Europe (see: Vlaams Belang, BNP, SIOE, Pat Buchanan, etc.)

2. Support for bigotry, hatred, and white supremacism (see: Pat Buchanan, Ann Coulter, Robert Stacy McCain, Lew Rockwell, etc.)

3. Support for throwing women back into the Dark Ages, and general religious fanaticism (see: Operation Rescue, anti-abortion groups, James Dobson, Pat Robertson, Tony Perkins, the entire religious right, etc.)

4. Support for anti-science bad craziness (see: creationism, climate change denialism, Sarah Palin, Michele Bachmann, James Inhofe, etc.)

5. Support for homophobic bigotry (see: Sarah Palin, Dobson, the entire religious right, etc.)

6. Support for anti-government lunacy (see: tea parties, militias, Fox News, Glenn Beck, etc.)

7. Support for conspiracy theories and hate speech (see: Alex Jones, Rush Limbaugh, Glenn Beck, Birthers, creationists, climate deniers, etc.)

8. A right-wing blogosphere that is almost universally dominated by raging hate speech (see: Hot Air, Free Republic, Ace of Spades, etc.)

9. Anti-Islamic bigotry that goes far beyond simply criticizing radical Islam, into support for fascism, violence, and genocide (see: Pamela Geller, Robert Spencer, etc.)

10. Hatred for President Obama that goes far beyond simply criticizing his policies, into racism, hate speech, and bizarre conspiracy theories (see: witch doctor pictures, tea parties, Birthers, Michelle Malkin, Fox News, World Net Daily, Newsmax, and every other right wing source)

And much, much more. The American right wing has gone off the rails, into the bushes, and off the cliff.

Incidently, must of this criticism of right-wingers also applies to the Islamists they claim to dislike .That is: 2 (change “white supremacism” to “Islamic supremacism”),  3, 4, 5, 7. So although the extremist Western right-wingers and the extremist Islamists hate each other, they both have essentially the same mindset and underlying psychology,

The problem here is that the sensible Republicans can’t split to form their own party, because the electoral system in the USA enforces a rigid two party system. Another reason why FPTP is bad.

This affects Britain because, like it or not, the USA is the leader of the West, being the biggest Western country with the largest population, economy, and armed forces.

If the Republican Party is dominated by nutters, and they stand a reasonable chance of winning future elections, it would then be very problematic for the West. Which is why we need  a strong European Union to be a potential counterweight to the USA, and to carry the torch of liberal, secular, democratic values.

Yes the EU is wasteful (common agricultural policy), corrupt (accounts not audited for years) and has a democratic deficit (no-one elected Rompuy and Ashton), but if it didn’t exist it would have to be invented. The EU is in obvious need to serious reform.

(via Liberal Conspiracy)

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5 Responses to LGF and the Republicans

  1. MatGB says:

    The problem here is that the sensible Republicans can’t split to form their own party, because the electoral system in the USA enforces a rigid two party system. Another reason why FPTP is bad.

    Sort of. There is always scope for a realignment, but it will take electoral meltdown of some sort combined with a bunch of incumbents splitting off to form their own party (instead of simply switching sides).

    There are a large chunk of conservative Democrats, and a bunch of fairly liberal republicans, if the ground was right (ie Dems are unpopular but not as unpopular as the Repubs), then there’s space for a realignment.

    If someone like Palin gets their nominee next time, I expect it to happen. And I really ought to look into some recent literature on this then write it up, it’s so close to my specialty that even an off prediction will be interesting.

  2. “Sensible” Republicans? What you mean the RINOs who agree, pretty much, with all the socialist ideas coming out of the Obama administration. A RINO called John McCain got crushed last time and if the Republicans put up another he/she will get crushed again.

    Good to see that you have taken Johnson’s “Soros paid for” screed at face value. He is taking one small section of the right and painting us all with the same brush. What exactly do fiscal conservative/libertarians have in common with a fascist/jew-hater like Pat Buchanan? In fact he and other less insane so-cons make it clear they loath libertarians with as much passion as the left.

    To call Johnson on the right now… is a joke. He is fully paid up member of the right-hating Soros-funded Kos-type blogs.

    • cabalamat says:

      What exactly do fiscal conservative/libertarians have in common with a fascist/jew-hater like Pat Buchanan?

      Not a lot. Then again fiscal conservatism isn’t the same thing as libertarianism, and neither has very much in common with Palin, who mostly stands for religious populism, with a touch of anti-science sentiment.

  3. George Carty says:

    Doesn’t the Latin American experience show that proportional representation and presidential democracy don’t mix? Any attempt to make the USA more democratic (by proportional representation, abolishing the electoral college, compulsory voting) is likely to backfire because of the fragility of the presidentialist system, as shown by all those Latin American states which fell to tyranny during the post-WWII era.

    On the other hand a fundamental change in the constitutional order would be almost impossible – in many of those Latin American states previously mentioned there was talk of introducing parliamentary government instead when democracy was restored, but nothing ever came of it.

    Check out Fred W. Riggs’s Problems of Presidentialism.

    • cabalamat says:

      Doesn’t the Latin American experience show that proportional representation and presidential democracy don’t mix?

      I’m not sure it does. If the USA used PR, I don’t think the result would be a military coup. If it happened in Latin America, that was more likely due to the fragility of democratic institutions and values in those countries.

      make the USA more democratic (by proportional representation, abolishing the electoral college, compulsory voting)

      I don’t see how compulsory voting is more democratic. If people don’t want to vote, they shouldn’t be forced to.

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